MENU THE ARTS SOCIETY DORSET COUNTY
Click here to view previous lectures

DateLecture
19 September 2019BORN IN THE LANDSCAPE: Norwegian Arts from Stave Churches to Snøhetta
17 October 2019POTS AND FROCKS: The world of Grayson Perry. From Essex Potter to Superstar National Treasure
21 November 2019MUSIC AND ART IN THE AGE OF VERMEER
04 December 2019IN THE KINGDOM OF THE SWEETS

Click on a row and scroll to display more details about the lecture

BORN IN THE LANDSCAPE: Norwegian Arts from Stave Churches to Snøhetta Rosamund Bartlett Thursday 19 September 2019

From the elaborate carvings on ancient wooden Stave churches to the ultra-modern design of Oslo-based practice Snøhetta ('Snow Hat'), the Norwegian arts have always had a close relationship with nature.  This lecture will explore how Norways' dramatic, rugged and beautiful landscape has inspired and shaped its music, painting and architecture from the medieval period to the present day.  Subjects to be discussed include the 'animal art' of the Viking-era Urnes Stave Church, the music of Edvard Grieg, the paintings of Munch and Astrup, and the cutting-edge landscape architectural projects commissioned for Norway's National Tourist Routes. 

About the lecturer:

Rosamund Bartlett is a writer, scholar and translator with expertise in Russian and European art, literature and music.  She completed her doctorate at Oxford, and has held a number of senior university appointments, most recently at the European University Institute in Florence.

            She is the author and editor of several books, including Wagner and Russia and Shostakovich in Context, as well as biographies of Chekhov and Tolstoy.  Her introduction to The Russian Soul: Selections from A Writer's Diary by Fyodor Dostoevsky, was published in 2017. She has also been commissioned to write articles and reviews for a wide range of publications, both scholarly and popular, such as The Daily Telegraph, The Wall Street Journal, the international art magazine Apollo, and the programmes of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden.  As a translator she has published two volumes of Chekhov’s stories and the first uncensored edition of his letters. Her new translation of Anna Karenina for Oxford World’s Classics was published to acclaim in 2014. 

            She has lectured at public institutions around the world, ranging from the British Library in London to the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney, collaborated with the organisations such as the National Theatre and the Salzburg Festival, and contributed to Proms events and radio broadcasts on the BBC.  She led the campaign to save Chekhov’s house in Yalta and was awarded the Chekhov 150th Anniversary Medal by the Russian government in recognition of her educational and charitable work.